Social media: Facebook

Here is something that I put together for the board and the membership of the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) about Facebook status. Please share this with all. It’s also applicable to anyone who has Internet.
Social media: Facebook
 
The most popular social media platform is Facebook. However it’s far from being the only one. Although it may be the most user friendly, Facebook moves a lot of data while twitter limits posts to 140 characters. It does allow for pictures. Recently, twitter has merged with LinkedIn, the biggest professional career social media site.
Both have news feeds based on your friends or followers.
Anything you post stays on your wall or timeline. You can check other people’s timelines to see what they have been up to.
Fallasburg Covered Bridge
Fallasburg Covered Bridge
To open an account on Facebook go to https://www.facebook.com. Enter your email and pick a password. And you can start posting. The most effective posts are short and with photos. Pick anything you like your experience from Fallasburg village, recent or old. I streamline the posting but I will need your help to make the social media campaign Fallasburg Today most efficient.
 
Posting on Facebook pages and groups
 
Fallasburg has both a page and a public group. The group is called Fallasburg Today.
You post on fb pages as a visitor in the left column and you post on the group in the main column. The difference between the page and the group is in number of posts by the entire group, so the group page is more dynamic because of the large number of people posting. You have to have a Facebook account to post. I approve the posts so nothing inappropriate appears there.
Again you can post anything remotely about Fallasburg. I first took the route of asking people for submissions, photos and memories, but that wasn’t efficient at all.
One of my Internet gurus taught me that efficiency on the Internet is a game of numbers. Large groups of people will post a large amount of info.
Plus it leads to new connections as well as old ones. That way a donor or a sponsor may emerge from the crowds. According to an Internet webinar, each follower or a friend transfers into a $1.
It is also important to follow the Fallasburg Today blog at http://fallasburgtoday.org for the same reasons of sharing and spreading info. The blog has sharing buttons, so you share the info  on your Facebook and twitter. It’s like a large organized machinery that works.
If you have questions please don’t hesitate to contact me on emmapalova@yahoo.com 
I’ve condensed the information that I have learned over the last three years into this brief statement. And I will share more.
 
 I’ll talk about twitter and mobile apps next time.
 
Thanks to all for your help and for sharing,
 
Emma Palova
Oct. 23, 2015
freelance writer based in Lowell, Michigan
Emma Blogs, LLC marketing

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Autumn in Fallasburg

Visit Fallasburg this fall

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- As the leaves turn burning red and the nights grow longer, the forgotten Fallasburg village sleeps its dream from the 1830s.

It was a dream of pioneer John Wesley Fallass who founded the village in 1837 to have a bustling place. He built a mill in 1839 in the village and began manufacturing flour and lumber. By 1850 the village boasted a grist mill and a sawmill that housed a chair factory. The chair factory may be one of the first furniture factories in the Grand Rapids area.

The road into the Fallasburg historical district from the north.
The road into the Fallasburg historical district from the north.

The bustling lumbering village also had a stone-mason, a pair of blacksmiths, horse barns, a hotel and tavern, two general stores, post office, distillery, school, a cemetery and a tannery.

It became a main stage route from Ionia to Grand Rapids, and a thriving settlement on the banks of the Flat River.

A thriving settlement in 1850s
Fallasburgh, a thriving settlement in 1850s

But, destiny had it different. Everything changed with the arrival of the D & M railroad line in Lowell instead of Fallasburg in 1858. The village started steadily declining with the post office closing in 1905 and the grist mill was torn down in 1912.

The Tower Farm circa 1850 in Fallasburg.
The Tower Farm circa 1850 in Fallasburg.

However, what is left of Mr. Fallass’ dream remains treasured to this day. The charming hamlet nestles in the northeast corner of Kent County on 42 acres along the banks of the Flat River. The original 1871 Fallasburg Covered Bridge connects the forgotten village  to the rest of the world. The bridge is a perfect Kodak spot favored by photographers and newlyweds.

Interpretive signs before the Covered Bridge.
Interpretive signs before the Covered Bridge.

The village includes a schoolhouse, village cemetery, and house museums: John Fallass House, Misner House, Tower Farm & Tower Barn and Fallass Barn.

The Covered Bridge stretches 100 feet long, 14 feet wide and 12 feet high. Its lattice-work trusses are made of white pine timbers from nearby Greenville.

Currently, it is the only one of two wooden covered bridges in Michigan open to traffic. The area lost the Whites Bridge Covered Bridge due to arson on July 7, 2013. Efforts are in the works to replace the sister bridge.

The entire village is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The one-room schoolhouse is open on Sundays.
The one-room schoolhouse is open on Sundays.

Take a tour on a picture perfect day, stop by the new interpretive signs in front of the Covered Bridge and get to know the story of the old Fallassburgh from the early 1830s roots to its decline in the early 1900s. But, slow down or you will get a $5 fine for riding or driving on the bridge faster than a walk, according to original 1872 signs.

You will immerse yourself into the past filled with villagers who played out the story. These included the founding Fallass family, the Moon family who were educators in the area, the Tower family and postmaster John M. Waters. The Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) has maintained the village since 1965 thanks to resident Leonora Tower who decided to share this gem with the community.

Fallasburg founder John Fallass' house
Fallasburg founder John Fallass’ house

The FHS president Ken Tamke said the lack of continued development has been both a blessing and a curse.

None of the current residents known as villagers wish for any further development other than maintaining the existing historical properties, according to a feasibility study conducted by Vergennes Township.

A county park that surrounds the village is used for weddings, reunions, company and Rotary picnics. You can hike, bike or ride through the park and the village.

It is the hope of FHS to restore the Tower Farm for community meetings and to maintain the house museums. A section of North Country Trail (NCT) runs through the village next to the Tower Barn.

Venture out to Fallasburg during the upcoming Lowell events Girls Night Out on Oct. 15 and Christmas through Lowell on Nov. 20, 21 & 22.

Mark your calendars for the annual “Christmas in Fallasburg” party this year set for Dec. 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. Suggested donation is $20.

Patronize our sponsors http://www.mainstreetinnlowell.com just three miles south of Fallasburg.

Main Street Inn in nearby Lowell.
Main Street Inn in nearby Lowell.

For more info on nearby Lowell events go to http://www.discoverlowell.org

For more information go to http://www.fallasburg.org.

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Check out this great new app!

Truly incredible tool.

emmapalova

Hey,Check out the Fallasburg Historical Society mobile app I just used! Powered by Como: http://www.como.com

I truly love the app. It has all the features including contacts, photos, video, forms, about, twitter and facebook feeds. I have a splitting headache from building it, but I am 90 percent there.

I have my own Emma Palova app and I am working on the Fallasburg Historical Society app. Follow us as we move into the future.

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Message from FHS president Ken Tamke

Come and explore the Fallasburg village today

Villagers have always recognized what a special place Fallasburg is, from the founding settlers to present day inhabitants.  Fifty years ago, villager Leonora Tower felt it was time to share this resource with the community at large. So, the West Central Michigan Historical Society was born, which  later became the Fallasburg Historical Society.

FHS president Ken Tamke
FHS president Ken Tamke

I marvel at how many visitors, locals and West Michiganders from far and near, are just discovering Fallasburg Village.

“Wow, I didn’t realize this existed,” is the most common response as they browse our museums and learn about this colorful slice of history.

I invite you to help us celebrate this 50TH Anniversary of our preservation efforts by taking a fall color tour through the Fallasburg Park across the Covered Bridge into the charming pioneer village.

Take a walk or a bike ride through the village this fall. Check out the gems of history, the John Fallass house, the Misner House, The Tower Farm & Barn and the one room schoolhouse museum.

The museum is open on Sundays from 2 p.m to 4 p.m. Docent led tours are available by appointment for groups.

Mark your calendars for a vintage Christmas in Fallasburg on Dec. 12 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 13944 Covered Bridge Road, north of Lowell.

Sign up for Fallasburg Today E-newsletter on our FHS facebook page to stay in the loop.

For more information on the Fallasburg Historical Society go to www.fallasburg.org

For more information on the Fallassburgh Flats, and their season schedule:  fallassburgflats@gmail.com

We hope to see you out there!

Ken Tamke, President

Fallasburg Historical Society

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

An epic moment 10-1-2015

From obscurity to social media & eblitz, FHS launches E-newsletter Fallasburg Today on 10-1-2015

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- The Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) has emerged from a forgotten 1830s pioneer village of the past as a leader of historic preservation into the future. The vibrant society has 50 years of experience in the field, an active board, volunteers, members, sponsors and supporters.

The FHS president Ken Tamke took the lead in getting the society on the fast track with social media marketing and blogging after a stagnant struggle to increase public awareness.

The first Fallasburg Today newsletter is out
The first Fallasburg Today newsletter is out

The FHS website at fallasburg.org with a Facebook page plug-in and a donate paypal button is stocked with good information, but lacks the dynamics and connectivity of blogging and social media blitz.

“Our goal is to double the membership and increase the participation in our events,” said Tamke, “to build up on our current events and new events.”

As of today, Oct. 1 the FHS has a brand new E-newsletter with all the sharing buttons. Partners and sponsors images are linked to their websites.

“We’re very excited about the progress we have made since the inception of the society in 1965,” he writes in his president’s message.

FHS president Ken Tamke
FHS president Ken Tamke

The new Fallasburg bazaar held in September generated a definite interest in the village. Twenty people came from a distance looking for the historical buildings, according to pioneer bazaar vendors.

“We met our goals of increasing public awareness of the village of Fallasburg,” said FHS marketer Emma Palova of Emma Blogs, LLC. “We will continue to move forward with our projects.”

And it is a long list of projects with funding yet to emerge. The FHS will pursue grant funding from local and regional sources, donors and sponsorship.

The ongoing repair of the Tower Farm with a price tag of $100,000 has been on the FHS radar screen for a long time. The roof has been repaired, but the rest of the exterior and interior need work.

Tower Farm at Fallasburg
Tower Farm at Fallasburg

The archived materials need to be transferred into digital form. An intern from the Lowell Area Historical Museum will be working on that, according to Tamke.

An E-brochure “Fallasburg Today” and an E-book “50 Years of Fallasburg Historic Preservation” (c)  and a mobile app are in the works.

The Fallasburg Today blog will introduce a new “Fall back in time” (c) reading series from the news and the FHS archives to get through the long winter months. This will dovetail with the E-book project.

“My goal is to transport the readers of this series back in time when John Fallas founded the village in 1800s,” said Palova, “But I want to keep it lively and entertaining with a dramatic twist.”

The series was inspired by the Bannister community of Czech origin keeping the Czech agricultural heritage alive in the middle of nowhere.

The FHS is also a part of the Tri-River Historical Museum Network that links together small town museums in Barry, Ionia, Kent & Montcalm counties. The network of 27 museums is located along the Flat, Grand and Thornapple Rivers.

Chair Sally Johnson said she will present the proposed “Fall Back in Time” 2016 tour at the joint meeting in Grattan Township on Oct. 20 at 10 a.m.

The tour would be modeled after the successful “Spring into the Past” museum tour in May.

Visit with our partners:

Tri-River Museum Network at http://www.ioniahistory.org

Whites Bridge Historical Society at http://whitesbridgehistoricalsociety.org

Lowell Area Historical Museum at www.lowellmuseum.org

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.