Historic Farmhouse Listed

Fallasburg Historical Society

 Historic Farmhouse Listed!

Spread the word!Experience Farmhouse Living. Due to the overwhelming response, the new rental price is $1,200. The FHS will first consider non-pet owners and then pet owners.  · Lowell, MI

Live the farmhouse life in a thoroughly and lovingly renovated home! Original hardwood floors throughout. Located just outside of Lowell in historic Fallasburg Village. Imagine the historic Fallasburg Covered Bridge waving goodbye to you in the morning and welcoming you home in the evening. Immediate access to North Country Trails, beautiful Fallasburg Park, and the pristine Flat River. Prospective tenants are people who value and enjoy an historic home surrounded by nature. The home features three bedrooms upstairs, and two baths – one up and one down – with laundry upstairs conveniently located near the bedrooms. References and credit check required. $1050/month-to-month; First month and equal deposit. You’ll be renting from Fallasburg Historical Society www.fallasburg.org . Tenant responsible for lawn mowing and snow removal and utilities. No pets. Apply at open house on Sunday 1-3PM. COVID guidelines will be followed. If it’s still listed, it’s still available.

Copyright (c) 2021. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Coming soon “Tales From the Burg” 2

Fallassburgh Cubs

Watch for the next installment in the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) brand new series “Tales From the Burg.”

We will delve deep into the past of the Fallassburg Cubs, the predecessors of the Falassburg Flats. The story will explore the possible connection of baseball player Raymond Miller, who lived in Fallasburg village, with the Fallassburg Cubs.

Another “Tale” will follow-up to the first installment. It’s a letter written in 1857 by a Fallasburgh resident about taking a Ferry boat from Grand Haven to Grand Rapids on the Grand River.

“This is very cool history not only from Fallasburg, but from West Michigan,” said FHS president Ken Tamke.

The debut installment of “Tales From the Burg” was about Mr. Goodsell’s letter reminiscing the construction of the first Covered Bridge.

Copyright (c) 2021. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Remembering Dottie Blain

By FHS president Ken Tamke

I first met Dottie Blain in 2005 when I joined the Fallasburg Historical Society Board of Directors.  She was a strong, resilient, country woman cut from the same cloth as my grandmother.  They knew each other, as did most residents of the close-knit communities of Vergennes and Lowell.  She was also a Dorothy like my mom, shortened to Dot or Dottie with those who were close. Dottie and I hit it off immediately. 

As I plunged in at FHS to assist with the Covered Bridge Bike Tour, and Christmas in Fallasburg, I quickly realized Dottie was a main organizational force behind our signature events.  “Chief cook and bottle washer” was a humorous way to characterize her participation, yet her involvement went much further.

Anyone who ever attended our Christmas In Fallasburg “Pot Luck” in the Fallasburg Schoolhouse, sampling the various culinary offerings set out around the room owed their sigh of satisfaction to Dottie’s cooking.  Her Swedish Meatballs were legendary!  Cooking aside, her coordination of other contributors; cookie bakers and salad makers, table setters and supply go-getters, kept everything running smoothly.  If we were lucky, there’d be leftovers to take home after the party.

The Covered Bridge Bike Tour presented many, many challenges, but that didn’t faze Dottie.  We never really knew how many riders we would attract each year.  Anywhere from 100 – 250.  While they’d all set out at roughly the same time, they returned to Fallasburg Village piecemeal and want to be fed.  Dottie’s Country Style Italian feast, meatless or vegetarian with grilled garlic bread would be waiting, piping hot, whether 11:00AM or 2:00PM.  And, then of course, there was dessert-Strawberry Shortcake.  Never mind the various rest stops along the different cycling routes.  Dottie had them stocked with home baked cookies, fresh fruit, and Gatorade.  A logistical nightmare to be sure, but Dottie always had the situation well in hand.  FHS owes the longevity of the Covered Bridge Bike Tour, 25 years, in no small part to Dottie.

Dottie took great pride in preservation of Fallasburg Village by virtue of her Lowell roots and longtime friends.  She attended Lowell High School where she met Larry Martin, a fellow FHS Board Member, and architect of the Covered Bridge Bike Tour from the cycling side.  Larry was the great-grandson of Edwin Fallas, great-grandson of John Wesley Fallas-founder of Fallasburg Village.  Dottie and Larry shared similar temperaments, senses of humor, and their appreciation for the remarkable historic district of which they were stewards.

One of the most difficult things I’ve ever had to do was inform Dottie on the morning of the 17TH Annual Covered Bridge Bike Tour, Larry Martin had been hit and killed on a bike ride the afternoon before as fate would have it.  While grief-stricken that a kindred spirit had passed, her strength of character somehow got her through the day where many would have broken down.

The Fallasburg Historical Society mourns the passing of our colleague, but moreover our dear friend.  Dottie Blain, Rest in Peace.

Ken Tamke, Fallasburg Historical Society

Obituary

Blain, Dorothy 12/12/1940 – 1/5/2021 Lowell Blain – Dorothy A. Blain nee Pearson, age 80, passed away on Tuesday, January 5, 2021. She was preceded in death by her parents, John Pearson in 1964 and Joanne Bittle in 1990. Dorothy is survived by her children, Sheila (Tim) Aalsburg and Kenneth Blain; granddaughters, Chloe and Maya; youngest sister, Frances “Fran” (Rick) Rowell of Louisiana; childhood friend, Addie (Orison) Abel. Dorothy will be remembered for her generosity and hosting large family gatherings. She grew up in southern Michigan and graduated from Lowell High School in 1959. She married and raised two children. Through the years, Dorothy worked as an upholsterer, a realtor, school bus driver, and a greeter at Meijer. Per Dorothy’s request, cremation has taken place. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Fallasburg Historical Society. To share a photo, memory and to sign the online guestbook please visit www.stegengafuneralchapel.com

Featured photo: FHS volunteers at the Lowell Expo in 2017: Dottie Blain, Mike Organek, Addie Abel.

Copyright (c) 2021. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Fallasburg Christmas party and bonfire cancelled

Hello to all,

The Fallasburg Historical Society board has cancelled both the Christmas party and the bonfire scheduled for tomorrow in the village of Fallasburg. Don’t forget to mark you calendars for next year’s Christmas party on Dec. 11, 2021. We will post a short video from the previous Christmas parties with music by Hawks and Owls.

Follow our brand new series “Tales From the Burg” that connects readers with the FHS collection of artifacts known as “Collective Access.”

Copyright (c) 2020. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Featured

Tales From the Burg

Welcome to our series “Tales From the Burg” designed to connect the readers with the Fallasburg Historical Society’s (FHS) prescious treasure of artifacts known as Collective Access. You can find individual artifacts by clicking the link below:

https://collection.fallasburg.org/

The series will have the logo of Mr. Goodsell’s letter. We encourage your input and feedback by commenting below or on social media. Enjoy the first installment about Mr. Goodsell’s memories of the construction of the Fallasburg Covered Bridge.

Tales From the Burg

Flat River Days, Building a Bridge

Prologue 

In 1821, John Orton Goodsell, originally from Oneida, New York and ninth son of Goodsell Family patriarch John Sr., purchased 190 acres in Vergennes Township at the end of what is now known as Beckwith Drive.  The property, framed by the Flat River on three sides, looked down upon the river, and what would become the location of the Fallasburg Covered Bridge, gateway to Fallasburg Village founded in 1839 by John Wesley Fallass.

Clark W. Goodsell (C.W.), John Orton Goodsell’s son, was born in 1859, one of two children from his father’s second marriage. The following reflections come in the form of a letter dated August 7, 1932 from C. W., who grew up just a stone’s throw from Fallasburg to Villager Hermann Jones. Here are links to the original letter and land abstract from the Fallasburg Historical Society Collection.

Clark Goodsell.

https://collection.fallasburg.org/Gallery/14

                            https://collection.fallasburg.org/Gallery/13 

                                                                                                              

Harrisville, August 7 – 1932

Mr. Hermann Jones,

Dear Sir, I received your letter O.K. but have been busy of late fishing for company.

Well, I guess I know more about Fallassburg than anyone left now. I was born up on the hill west of the

Burg in 1859, so I can remember a lot.  On a 2 X 4 on the northwest side of the old bridge is my name dated June 18TH, 1880, the day I first left home.

That bridge was built by a Frenchman by the name of Jerard Buzee. He built 9 such bridges after Flat River.  That bridge was built 1867 as near as I can make out. I was about 8 years old when Buzee and his crew boarded at our house while they framed the bridge.

I rode rafts of lumber down the Flat before they ran any logs, many times.  Ed Lewis, Charlie Richmond, and I have rode over the shoot on logs when we were boys.  I could ride anything that would hold me up or wore hair.  I rode a horse for John Fallass in the first fair at Lowell.  I weighed 48 pounds, so small they had to strap me on.  I rode runners until I was 26.  John Wright can tell you about my riding.  Give Billie Rex my regards.

Yours Truly,

C.W Goodsell

Epilogue

Four other bridges (not covered) preceded the Fallasburg Covered Bridge, the very first being built in 1839.  By 1849 the first two had failed.  The third bridge, a sturdier affair, lasted until 1860.  Enter bridge builder Jared N. Brasee & Co.  For $249.50, Brasee reconstructed the third bridge, now the fourth to span the Flat River.  In the spring and into summer of 1871, for $1,500, Brasee & Co. built the fifth-the Fallasburg Covered Bridge.  Villager, F.A. Geill adorned the portals of the bridge in 1872 with the signs, “$5 Fine for Driving on This Bridge Faster Than A Walk”, which are still in place today. 

2021 will mark the 150TH Anniversary of the Fallasburg Covered Bridge

It is hard to ignore that Villager, Hermann Jones, recipient of C.W. Goodsell’s letter in 1932 was not related somehow to Frank Jones.  Jones ran a General Store and a Tavern in Fallasburg Village in the mid-to-late 1800’s, was an avid hunter, fisherman, and trapper, living in a variety of dwellings within the Village, one of which was a small summer cottage on River St. sitting just above the covered bridge.  Here’s a picture of Frank Jones with his Flat River bounty, a Pike as tall as he is:

Descendants of the Goodsell Family are today, still present in West Michigan and beyond.  The farmhouse John Orton Goodsell built in the early 1820’s stood until 1950 when the property was purchased by Clarence and Stella Bradshaw.  Unable to save the original, the Bradshaw’s had to tear it down and start again.  Here is the 125-year-old Goodsell Farmhouse in 1950 before, and the Bradshaw home in 1951 after.

Copyright (c) 2020. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

In observance of Veterans Day

Pause to remember a veteran today for his or her service to our country.

Enjoy this post:

Click on the link below to read about veterans at the Fallasburg Cemetery in Vergennes Township.

Veterans at Fallasburg Cemetery

Featured Image -- 61120

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