Ken Tamke @fallasburg

Ghostbusters at Fallasburg

A ghost walk and a history lesson at Fallasburg

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Fallasburg, MI- It was a spooky Saturday night before Halloween at the Fallasburg historical village.

“Put your cell phones in the airplane mode,” advised Edwin Lelieveld, Michigan Paranormal Alliance (MPA) team member.

The Michigan Paranormal Alliance (MPA), the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) and their followers conducted a paranormal investigation inside the Fallasburg museum buildings.

“This has been two years in the making,” said Tina Siciliano Cadwallader, FHS event organizer.

Signing in @fallasburg
Tina Siciliano Cadwallader organized the paranormal investigation @fallasburg

Cadwallader put the first time event together as a fundraiser for the historical society.

The MPA started with an introduction inside the Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse museum. We filed behind the old creaking and squeaky desks much like the students did some 150 years ago. The classroom filled up and there was standing room only.

Inside @fallasburg
Ghost hunters inside the Fallasburg schoolhouse museum.

The ghost detecting equipment such as gauss meters, temperature gauges and nitrogen goggles laid on a separate table by the old piano.

The MPA team set up laser purple dot grids and EVP (Electronic Voice Phenomenon) equipment at each location of the paranormal investigation. That is the Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse, John Wesley Fallass House and David Misner House, all of which sit on the Covered Bridge Road. An MPA team member was at each location to interpret the recordings of the EVP sessions.

MPA @fallasburg
The Michigan Paranormal Alliance (MPA) conducts investigation @fallasburg

We divided into three groups, each led by an FHS docent.

My husband Ludek and I were in the group with FHS president Ken Tamke and Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) employees. We walked down the Covered Bridge Road lighting our way with flashlights. We briefly paused at the Tower Farm, better known as the Tower House. We could not go inside because of its dilapidated interior. The FHS is currently seeking funds to repair the Tower House.

“Two sisters lived here,” said Tamke. “It was normal at the time.”

Tamke said there have been reports of haunting at the Tower House.

Local resident Addie Tower Abel, who went to the one-room schoolhouse, said there has been a lot of activity.

“I know about the Tower House, I lived there. So, did my son, they saw a lot of activities,” Abel wrote on facebook.

Lie Kotecki of MPA conducted the EVP session inside the 1842 John W. Fallass house. The temperature gauge in the middle of the completely restored living room showed 66.6 F. According to the MPA, the temperature drops when ghosts are present causing cold spots. The ghosts also give out electromagnetic fields.

Inside John W. House @fallasburg
Lie Kotecki of Michigan Paranormal Society (MPA) conducts an EVP session inside the John W. Fallass House.

“Drop the temperature if you are inside the house with us,” challenged Lie.

The temperature dropped slightly to 66.2 F.

“Did you live in this house?” she asked. “We have no bad energy.”

The FHS president Ken Tamke explained the historical facts at each paranormal investigative location aka museum building.

“The furniture was built from the lumber out of a sawmill at Fallasburg,” he said. “Orwin Douglas built the Tower House and John Waters built the David Misner House.”

Native Indian collection @fallasburg
Native Indian collection @fallasburg

Back at the schoolhouse, Rosemary Leleiveld reported various ghost encounters.

“I felt a female spirit here,” she said. “Missy or Melissa…..”

But, Tamke said it could have been the ghost of Fallasburg resident Ferris Miller, who had died within the last five years.

“We have modern devices,” said Rosemary, “but we come with respect.”

The next EVP session followed at the Misner House. It is the most completed museum out of the Fallasburg portfolio, according to Tamke.

The MPA members usually turn off the lights for the sessions, although they have done EVP sessions in the middle of the day.

Inside Misner House @fallasburg
Michigan Paranormal Alliance members Peggy and Jason Kotecki listen to EVP recording at the Misner House.

“The atmosphere veil becomes thinner,” said Peggy Kotecki, MPA team member. “We use radio frequencies and cameras,” she said.

Jason Kotecki, IT engineer at VanAndel Institute, analyzed the EVP recording at the Misner House and reported about other findings. The MPA team conducted a session in Allegan.

“Have you been to the old Allegan county jail?” Jason asked.

“Not yet,” said Ludek Pala.

“Well, we heard a giggle there,” he said.

Peggy, a nurse at Spectrum, said that sometimes she questions her sanity.

“It’s mostly a boring thing to do,” she said. “We do a lot of recordings and a lot of listening. But, you go for the whole package and you relive it.”

During the EVP session, Peggy asked questions:

“What is your name? Did you live here? Did you have children? Did they go to the schoolhouse down the road?”

The MPA does not solicit business and the paranormal alliance does not charge for their investigations.

“The purpose of the investigation is two-fold,” Rosemary Leleiveld said. “We do ghost hunting and we have ghost hunting equipment at each location. You do a ghost walk and learn more of a history of a location. The architecture draws me in.”

For more info on Fallasburg go to www.fallasburg.org

For more info on MPA go to: www.m-p-a.org

For more info on EW Emma’s Writings go to http://emmapalova.com

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

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Fallasburg Bridge Model

Fallasburg model bridges across cultures, traditions

By Emma Palova

Here is the story of German student of architecture Bene Hofmann. Hofmann will be constructing a model of the Fallasburg Covered Bridge as his school project in Linz.

The Fallasburg Historical Society is extremely excited about the project that will spread the word about historical preservation beyond the borders of North America.

Hofmann will be using the blueprints from the 1994 bridge rehabilitation project provided by Wayne Harrall of the Kent County Road Commission. 

Kent County Road Commission blueprints.
Blueprints for the 1994 rehabilitation of the Fallasburg Covered Bridge.

In our first semester subject structure workswe had the opportunity to choose a wood or loam building which significantly presents an interesting type of truss work and then build a model of it. I really wanted to choose a bridge, because I admire the way these structures deal with physics.

Fallas Bene Hofmann
Bene Hofmann

My professor was once in Michigan and told me about the beautiful covered wooden bridges in this area. He told me about his experience when he rode in a coach through one of these covered bridges.

Fallas bridge b&w

“The sound impression you get riding over the boards in these long covered bridges is incomparablehe said. “And of course, they present a really effective and an intelligent truss.”

So, next thing I was doing was searching on Google for covered bridges and the one I liked the most was the Fallasburg Covered Bridge, the way its built and its scenic setting. It  perfectly conveys the atmosphere of a traditional historical bridge. Thats why I chose this bridge for my project.

Before my studies I was traveling to Australia, Asia and South America (sadly not North America.)

I think the most beautiful thing about  these  places is their tradition, reflected not only in buildings, but also in food and behavior of different nationalities.

The Fallsburg Covered Bridge is a really nice and authentic example of what I imagine as a typical rural building. Therefore I think it should get a lot of attention.

The Fallasburg Covered Bridge, built in 1871, was listed with the Michigan State Register on February 12, 1959. It was awarded a Michigan Historical Marker on September 10, 1971 and was listed with the National Register on March 16, 1972.
Directions: From Ada, follow M-21 to Lowell. Turn north on Hudson Street, which becomes Lincoln Lake Avenue. Turn east on Fallsburg County Park Road. Follow the signs.

For more information on the bridge to to http://www.fallasburg.org

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.