Fallasburg village bazaar

The 2nd annual Fallasburg village bazaar will be held on Sept. 17th & Sept.18th from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the historical village located in the northeast corner of Kent County.

Cross the covered bridge into the 1850s pioneer village founded by John W. Fallass. You will immerse yourself in historical atmosphere of a time gone by. Get your Christmas shopping done early here at the village bazaar.

“In my opinion, the village is a more relaxed atmosphere.  One of my favorite parts of last year’s event, was the camaraderie among the vendors – most of us had not met prior to the event!  I am happy to share that a number of vendors this year, were vendors last year,” said bazaar organizer Michelle Emaus.

Fallasburg village bazaar partners are Whites Bridge historical society and Fallasburgh Flats vintage base ball team.
Nancy Price Stroosnyder of the Whites Bridge historical society at the first annual Fallasburg village bazaar.

The Fallasburgh Flats vintage base ball team will play the last game of the season on Sept. 17th.

Share the Fallasburg Historical Society message with your friends. Follow us on social media, sign up for the Fallasburg Today E-newsletter to stay in the loop.

Watch for full story with a list of vendors coming soon. What would you like to see at the village bazaar?

Visit our partners Whites Bridge historical society at http://www.whitesbridgehistoricalsociety.org

Fallasburgh Flats vintage base ball team at

http://www.fallasburghflats.com

For open slots at the bazaar contact Michelle at michelle_emaus@yahoo.com

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Fallasburg one-room school.

In search of the Fallasburg past online

Searching for the Fallasburg past online

By Emma Palova

Note: This is the second part of a story about a former Calvin College history intern Katelyn Bosch. Bosch completed her internship at the Lowell Area Historical Museum and the Fallasburg Historical Society this summer.

Bosch has laid a foundation for future organizing and computerizing of the FHS artifacts dating back to 1839 when John W. Fallass came to the site.

Fallasburg, MI -The internship has strengthened the bond between the two like-minded organizations, FHS and LAHM, while collectively taking part in preserving, and disseminating the knowledge of the local history, according to FHS president Ken Tamke.

Katelyn Bosch at Fallasburg.
Calvin College intern Katelyn Bosch assisted Fallasburg with computerization of artifacts.

It is the hope that the project of cataloguing and digitalizing the FHS artifacts will continue through another internship.

“It’s been wonderful to experience the whole process of accessing the artifacts and to be the person touching them,” said Bosch. “I’ve enjoyed meeting all the people like Ken and Lisa, who are passionate about this. They were mentors to me.”

Bosch, who will study public history at the West Virginia University in a two-year program views history as an intellectually dynamic field.

“I like to see how people interacted,” she said. “The public history field is very interdisciplinary. It’s about culture, economics and political systems.”

That fits in well with Bosch’s love to travel. She took an off-campus program in Great Britain about British film and media.

“The Internet is the key to get publicity and to find out about history,” she said.

Bosch said she would volunteer again at the local small town museums.

The Misner House
History intern Katelyn Bosch helped organize FHS artifacts.

The Fallasburg village, although frozen in time, is moving ahead with its artifacts and pioneer stories coming alive due to modern technology. As such, the village stands at the intersection of two major study disciplines: strategic communications and history.

“It’s interesting how people will be looking to find historical documents in the right place,” Bosch said.

“The Past Online” project is currently under development, according to LAHM director Lisa Plank. “We will be making an announcement when it’s ready.”

However, in the meantime, a lot of historical facts, documents and pictures can be found on social media like Pinterest. You can go to Pinterest and put in the keywords Fallasburg or Fallasburg Historical Village, and you will find a collection of information pertaining to the village. You can also contribute your news and artifacts pertaining to Fallasburg.

Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse.
Calvin College intern Katelyn Bosch in front of Fallasburg schoolhouse.

Bosch said that the FHS needs to be as interactive as possible with the public.

“It’s a neat set up here already, you have the main town street preserved and the museum buildings,” she said. “The covered bridge is a huge asset to the village.”

 

Follow the FHS on social media. Become a part of the movement into the future, as a member. Go to http://fallasburgtoday.org

Sign up for Fallasburg Today E-newsletter to stay in the loop. You can sign up either on the Fallasburg Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/Fallasburg-Historical-Society-444666235652842/ or on the blog.

Join our Facebook public group Fallasburg Today.

 

Copyright © 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Fallasburg set for bike tour

Get ready for Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour

By Emma Palova

Fallasburg, MI- After months of anticipation, the biggest event of the year for the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) opens Sunday, July 10th at the Fallasburg historical village located three miles northeast of Lowell, Michigan.

On average 150 cyclists take to the paved roads on a variety of routes ranging from 12 miles to 100 miles. All the routes have been meticulously perfected and signed over the 22 years of the tour’s existence.

 

The registration starts at 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. at the one-room Fallasburg schoolhouse museum with the cost of $35 per person.

“We attract a niche of riders every year,” said FHS president Ken Tamke. “We wanted to do something active. We thought a bike ride would be cool.”

It is the plan to revamp the routes to include a route to the Whites Bridge that will be rebuilt this year. This would include a kayaking option on the Flat River.

“We want to keep it local,” said Tamke.

The historic village is a true hidden gem on the banks of the Flat River founded by John Fallass in 1839. It includes the Tower Farm, the Misner House, the Fallass House, the Fallasburg Covered Bridge and the baseball field with the Fallas Barn built in 1896.

The baseball field serves as home field for the Fallasburg Cubs Vintage Base Ball Club.

The Fallasburg covered bridge spanning 100 feet serves as a gateway to the sleepy village lost in time, that was once a bustling town with sawmills and hotels.

The most popular 28-mile route will take you from the Fallasburg bridge to the covered bridge in Ada and back. All the routes begin and end in Fallasburg.

The grand finale of all the tours is a home-made Italian spaghetti meal served in the yard of the Misner House with the help of eight to 10 volunteers.

“Come and join us this year, enjoy the country and our sleepy little village,” said Tamke.

The FHS donates $1 per rider to support the League of Michigan Bicyclists (LMB) program in memory of ambassador of the bike tour Larry Martin. Martin was hit and killed on the eve of the 17th annual bike tour while riding his bike.

LMB is a lobbying group dedicated to making Michigan a safe place to bike.

 

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour

Pedal through the beautiful countryside at your own pace

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Lowell, MI- The 22nd annual Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour is set for Sunday, July 10th with registration in person at the one-room schoolhouse from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m.

Pre- registration online is at http://www.fallasburg.org or at the Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour page for $25 per individual, $35 for family before July 6th. After the deadline and in person, there will be an additional $5 charge.

There are several tour options ranging from 12 miles to 100 miles.

The most traveled route is the 28-mile route to Ada and back from the Fallasburg Covered Bridge to the Ada Covered Bridge , according to Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) president Ken Tamke,“It is a reasonably flat and easy ride for families and casual riders,” said Tamke.

The second most popular route is the South 50, which travels along rivers and streams through  beautiful farmland.

Although the main reason to bike any of the routes is fitness, the camaraderie and feeling of accomplishment and adventure of a bicycle tour with friends or family is even better.
“It is exhilarating and exciting to set out on a journey and successfully attain your goal, whether it be 12 miles, 28 miles, 50 miles or 100,” said Tamke.
The Covered Bridge Bike Tour has grown from just a handful of registrants to 253 registrants last year. But, 250 registrants means 300 plus riders as family registrations can cover multiple riders.
Fallas CBBT
Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour
“We’ve had modest gains, with more people joining the fun each year,” said Tamke.
The riders can select the distance they wish to ride from 12 miles to 100. They can also combine routes to get some variety. The 12-mile route climbs up Covered Bridge Road, over MacPherson to Sayles, then along the Flat River into Lowell and back to the village via Lincoln Lake.
The 28-mile route travels into Lowell along Lincoln Lake, then west along Grand River to Ada Park. The half-way point and rest stop is at the Ada Covered Bridge. The route follows the same path back to Fallasburg.
The 50-mile route south follows the same route as the 28, but turns south at Buttrick and heads down to 100th, then back east to Alden Nash and back up to Lowell and Lincoln Lake.
The 50-mile north route follows briefly the same path as the 12, but continues on into Ionia with a rest stop at the Blanchard House, then on to Saranac and back to Lowell along Riverside and eventually to the Fallasburg Village.
Last year approximately 20 riders completed the 100. They do the South 50 in the morning and the North 50 in the afternoon.
Fallas bike tour reg.
Registration at the one-room schoolhouse museum.
All proceeds from the bike tour go for the continued preservation of Fallasburg Village. The historical society uses the funds to maintain properties and implement educational programs.  Fallasburg Historical Society is an all-volunteer organization so monies collected don’t pay a salary, but pay to  fix things and teach people about Fallasburg history.
All routes begin and end in Fallasburg Village. The Misner House is the command center and serves as an outdoor lunchroom.
Dorothy “Dottie” Blain cooks a country-style Italian spaghetti and meatball feast and its vegetarian version  with garlic bread and strawberry shortcake for dessert.
“Our riders absolutely rave about our food,” said Tamke. Additionally, all routes offer home-baked goodies, fruit and water or Gatorade at rest stops along the way.  Each route has a rest stop.
Late Priscilla Lussmeyer came up with the idea of having a bike ride as a fundraiser for the society 22 years ago. She enlisted the help of one of her many friends who was into biking as a means to raise money for the society. It has grown steadily from there.
Tamke is hoping for  275 registrants and over 300 riders, 75 degrees, sunny and no humidity or wind – a perfect West Michigan day.
“I hope no one gets hurt, everyone has a fantastic time and tell all their friends about it so they can participate in the 23rd annual Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour,” said Tamke.
Tour options (in miles): 12, 28, 40, 50, 62, 78 or 100.
Registration fee: $25 for individuals / $35 for families.
For more information, call Ken Tamke at 616-682-0785 or e-mail kentamke@comcast.net
Directions to Fallasburg
From Lowell: North approximately 3 miles to Fallasburg Park Drive.
Right to entrance of park. Angle right on Covered Bridge Road.
Over covered bridge to schoolhouse. Park in field across the street.
There will be county road signs on Lincoln Lake Road and Fallasburg Park Drive, alerting you to Park/Bridge/Historic Village.
Follow FHS and the Fallasburg Covered Bridge Bike Tour on twitter @fallasburg #fallasburg #fallasburgbiketour #fallasburghistory #fallas and other social media.

Copyright (c) 2016. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

 

FHS at Lowell Expo

Mark your calendars

The Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) will be at the 20th Annual Lowell Community Expo on March 26 from 9 p.m. to 3 p.m.

The expo will be held at the Lowell High School located at 11700 Vergennes Street.

The goals are to increase the exposure of our organization to the community and to grow the FHS membership.

Watch for more information.

The Fallasburg historical village.
The Fallasburg historical village.

Copyright (c)2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Hello 2016

FHS president greets 2016 with optimism

As we begin the second 50 years of FHS’ existence, it’s never been easier for members, guests, friends, and visitors to connect with us on the technology path.  Fallasburg is now on Facebook.  Join the conversation #fallasburg2016.  We’re also on Twitter @fallasburg and on WordPress at Fallasburg Today on http://fallasburgtoday.org

fallas ken headshot
FHS president Ken Tamke

Of course, you can visit our website, www.fallasburg.org  and subscribe to our e-newsletter Fallasburg Today. But, our social media campaign, website, and newsletter are just a few of the things we’re excited about as we move ahead into the new year.

As part of a collaboration project between the Lowell Area Historical Museum and Calvin College History Department, an intern from the college will digitally catalogue FHS artifacts and documents in February.

Everyone from scholars to students and school kids will be able to examine our collections when it’s finished.

You can chat with us at Lowell Expo as we man our table at this wonderful community event on March 26, 2016

20160105_124039.jpg

April is winter cleanup time.  We’ll be preparing for Tri-Rivers Museum Network’s “Spring into the Past” event in early May.

Mark your calendars for April 30 and May 1, 2016 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This year’s theme is “Quilts- A stitch in time.”

Fallasburg village museums: the one-room Schoolhouse, the Misner House, and the Fallas House will be open to the public for free tours throughout the weekend as will 16 other local museums in the network.  There is never a better time to get a glimpse or our rich regional history.

On the heels of “Spring into the Past,” the Murray Lake Elementary School first grade class will get their glimpse at history as they pay the village another visit for a primer course.  And, the Fallassburgh Flats, our 1860’s style Vintage Base Ball team begins seasonal play on Fallas Field.  For information and schedule when available, contact the Flats at:  fallassburghflats@gmail.com

Fallassburgh Flats
Fallassburgh Flats vintage baseball team

On Sunday, July 10 all roads lead to Fallasburg Village…  If you’re on a bicycle that is.  The 22NDAnnual Covered Bridge Bike Tour takes to the streets for our signature event and chief fundraiser; the legacy of our dear friend and board member, Larry Martin, who dreamed the whole thing up back in 1994.

September offers a chance to catch up with FHS once again at the Lowell Area Arts Council’s, Fallasburg Fall Festival of the Arts in Fallasburg Park.  We’ll be on the south porch of the Pavilion as we have been for 40+ years.

Venture across the Fallasburg Covered Bridge on Fall Festival weekend and check out the Fallasburg Historical Society “Bazaar” featuring more arts, crafts, and treats.  Just several steps away you can take in some of the action on Fallas Field as the Fallassburgh Flats host the John Wesley Fallas Invitational Vintage Base Ball Tournament.  Four vintage teams will play a round-robin with games all day Saturday.

In October, we’re planning a secret Halloween event, but that’s all I can say now.  Details will be un-cloaked later…  Ghosts in Fallasburg?

Cap off 2016 with “Christmas in Fallasburg,” our community celebration at the Schoolhouse and in adjacent Fallas Field on Saturday, December 10 from 6-8PM.  Come help us toast another year of preserving historic Fallasburg Village!

Happy New Year!

Ken Tamke

FHS president

 

Copyright (c)2016 Emma Blogs,LLC. All rights reserved.

 

Autumn in Fallasburg

Visit Fallasburg this fall

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- As the leaves turn burning red and the nights grow longer, the forgotten Fallasburg village sleeps its dream from the 1830s.

It was a dream of pioneer John Wesley Fallass who founded the village in 1837 to have a bustling place. He built a mill in 1839 in the village and began manufacturing flour and lumber. By 1850 the village boasted a grist mill and a sawmill that housed a chair factory. The chair factory may be one of the first furniture factories in the Grand Rapids area.

The road into the Fallasburg historical district from the north.
The road into the Fallasburg historical district from the north.

The bustling lumbering village also had a stone-mason, a pair of blacksmiths, horse barns, a hotel and tavern, two general stores, post office, distillery, school, a cemetery and a tannery.

It became a main stage route from Ionia to Grand Rapids, and a thriving settlement on the banks of the Flat River.

A thriving settlement in 1850s
Fallasburgh, a thriving settlement in 1850s

But, destiny had it different. Everything changed with the arrival of the D & M railroad line in Lowell instead of Fallasburg in 1858. The village started steadily declining with the post office closing in 1905 and the grist mill was torn down in 1912.

The Tower Farm circa 1850 in Fallasburg.
The Tower Farm circa 1850 in Fallasburg.

However, what is left of Mr. Fallass’ dream remains treasured to this day. The charming hamlet nestles in the northeast corner of Kent County on 42 acres along the banks of the Flat River. The original 1871 Fallasburg Covered Bridge connects the forgotten village  to the rest of the world. The bridge is a perfect Kodak spot favored by photographers and newlyweds.

Interpretive signs before the Covered Bridge.
Interpretive signs before the Covered Bridge.

The village includes a schoolhouse, village cemetery, and house museums: John Fallass House, Misner House, Tower Farm & Tower Barn and Fallass Barn.

The Covered Bridge stretches 100 feet long, 14 feet wide and 12 feet high. Its lattice-work trusses are made of white pine timbers from nearby Greenville.

Currently, it is the only one of two wooden covered bridges in Michigan open to traffic. The area lost the Whites Bridge Covered Bridge due to arson on July 7, 2013. Efforts are in the works to replace the sister bridge.

The entire village is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The one-room schoolhouse is open on Sundays.
The one-room schoolhouse is open on Sundays.

Take a tour on a picture perfect day, stop by the new interpretive signs in front of the Covered Bridge and get to know the story of the old Fallassburgh from the early 1830s roots to its decline in the early 1900s. But, slow down or you will get a $5 fine for riding or driving on the bridge faster than a walk, according to original 1872 signs.

You will immerse yourself into the past filled with villagers who played out the story. These included the founding Fallass family, the Moon family who were educators in the area, the Tower family and postmaster John M. Waters. The Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) has maintained the village since 1965 thanks to resident Leonora Tower who decided to share this gem with the community.

Fallasburg founder John Fallass' house
Fallasburg founder John Fallass’ house

The FHS president Ken Tamke said the lack of continued development has been both a blessing and a curse.

None of the current residents known as villagers wish for any further development other than maintaining the existing historical properties, according to a feasibility study conducted by Vergennes Township.

A county park that surrounds the village is used for weddings, reunions, company and Rotary picnics. You can hike, bike or ride through the park and the village.

It is the hope of FHS to restore the Tower Farm for community meetings and to maintain the house museums. A section of North Country Trail (NCT) runs through the village next to the Tower Barn.

Venture out to Fallasburg during the upcoming Lowell events Girls Night Out on Oct. 15 and Christmas through Lowell on Nov. 20, 21 & 22.

Mark your calendars for the annual “Christmas in Fallasburg” party this year set for Dec. 12 from 6 to 8 p.m. Suggested donation is $20.

Patronize our sponsors http://www.mainstreetinnlowell.com just three miles south of Fallasburg.

Main Street Inn in nearby Lowell.
Main Street Inn in nearby Lowell.

For more info on nearby Lowell events go to http://www.discoverlowell.org

For more information go to http://www.fallasburg.org.

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

An epic moment 10-1-2015

From obscurity to social media & eblitz, FHS launches E-newsletter Fallasburg Today on 10-1-2015

By Emma Palova

Lowell, MI- The Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) has emerged from a forgotten 1830s pioneer village of the past as a leader of historic preservation into the future. The vibrant society has 50 years of experience in the field, an active board, volunteers, members, sponsors and supporters.

The FHS president Ken Tamke took the lead in getting the society on the fast track with social media marketing and blogging after a stagnant struggle to increase public awareness.

The first Fallasburg Today newsletter is out
The first Fallasburg Today newsletter is out

The FHS website at fallasburg.org with a Facebook page plug-in and a donate paypal button is stocked with good information, but lacks the dynamics and connectivity of blogging and social media blitz.

“Our goal is to double the membership and increase the participation in our events,” said Tamke, “to build up on our current events and new events.”

As of today, Oct. 1 the FHS has a brand new E-newsletter with all the sharing buttons. Partners and sponsors images are linked to their websites.

“We’re very excited about the progress we have made since the inception of the society in 1965,” he writes in his president’s message.

FHS president Ken Tamke
FHS president Ken Tamke

The new Fallasburg bazaar held in September generated a definite interest in the village. Twenty people came from a distance looking for the historical buildings, according to pioneer bazaar vendors.

“We met our goals of increasing public awareness of the village of Fallasburg,” said FHS marketer Emma Palova of Emma Blogs, LLC. “We will continue to move forward with our projects.”

And it is a long list of projects with funding yet to emerge. The FHS will pursue grant funding from local and regional sources, donors and sponsorship.

The ongoing repair of the Tower Farm with a price tag of $100,000 has been on the FHS radar screen for a long time. The roof has been repaired, but the rest of the exterior and interior need work.

Tower Farm at Fallasburg
Tower Farm at Fallasburg

The archived materials need to be transferred into digital form. An intern from the Lowell Area Historical Museum will be working on that, according to Tamke.

An E-brochure “Fallasburg Today” and an E-book “50 Years of Fallasburg Historic Preservation” (c)  and a mobile app are in the works.

The Fallasburg Today blog will introduce a new “Fall back in time” (c) reading series from the news and the FHS archives to get through the long winter months. This will dovetail with the E-book project.

“My goal is to transport the readers of this series back in time when John Fallas founded the village in 1800s,” said Palova, “But I want to keep it lively and entertaining with a dramatic twist.”

The series was inspired by the Bannister community of Czech origin keeping the Czech agricultural heritage alive in the middle of nowhere.

The FHS is also a part of the Tri-River Historical Museum Network that links together small town museums in Barry, Ionia, Kent & Montcalm counties. The network of 27 museums is located along the Flat, Grand and Thornapple Rivers.

Chair Sally Johnson said she will present the proposed “Fall Back in Time” 2016 tour at the joint meeting in Grattan Township on Oct. 20 at 10 a.m.

The tour would be modeled after the successful “Spring into the Past” museum tour in May.

Visit with our partners:

Tri-River Museum Network at http://www.ioniahistory.org

Whites Bridge Historical Society at http://whitesbridgehistoricalsociety.org

Lowell Area Historical Museum at www.lowellmuseum.org

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Bazaar vendor map

Here comes the Fallasburg village bazaar

Here is the vendor map for the upcoming Fallasburg village bazaar this weekend located inside the Fallasburg Park at the 1830s pioneer village.Just cross the Covered Bridge and step back in time. Also included is the village map. The park is three miles north of Lowell, Michigan.

Map of vendors at the first annual village bazaar.
Map of vendors at the first annual village bazaar.

Why not become a member of the Fallasburg Historic Society to help preserve the pioneer village for future generations? Email FHS president Ken Tamke at kentamke@comcast.net

Map of the pioneer Fallasburg village.
Map of the pioneer Fallasburg village.

Here is a list of the vendors:

Fallasburg Village Bazaar set for Sept. 19th & Sept. 20th from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. welcomes the following participants:

Follow us on twitter @fallasburg

Hubbert’s Kettle Corn – Home of the famous Unicorn Poop – Steve & Becky Hubbert

Kettle corn, cinnamon corn, caramel corn, cheese corn, Hubbert’s mix corn,

unicorn poop, frozen lemonade, jumbo pretzels w/cheese and bottled water

avadeldesigns.etsy.com
avadeldesigns.etsy.com

 Finger Stuck Felts – Kay Backstrom

Wool sculptures made from wool, using needles and wood-burning creations

Kathie’s Roadshow – Kathie Hollebeck

Womens jackets and tops, embellished sweater coats, scarves/jewelry and

deco mesh wreaths

Ava-Del Designs – Christine Dexter

Mixed media jewelry and crocheted hats

avadeldesigns.etsy.com

Mystic Mehndi – Jillian Hawkins/Jamie Shakleton

The service of applying henna to the body as a temporary “tattoo” – done on site with

aftercare instructions provided

Kropf’s Creations – Scott and Linda Phillips

Slabwood paintings, fabric jewelry, scarves, polished stones, coasters,

log wood furniture and magnets

Thunder Storm Rose Metal Art – Robert Rose (AKA “Franky”)

Recycled welding artist – taking salvaged and scrap metal objects and turning it into

artistic sculptures to be used as yard art

Rock art by
Doug and Marcia 

Rock art by Doug & Marcia
Rock art by Doug & Marcia

Rock candle holders, rock oil burning holders and necklaces made of shell rock from        Tennessee – all in its natural shape, cleaned and sealed.  Candles are also available for purchase

Shabby Chicnanigans – Michelle Emaus

Architectural salvage items and upcycled, shabby furniture and home accessories

Lowell Crew Team

 White’s Bridge Historical Society

 more still to come…

On Saturday only, there will be the final game of the Fallasburg Flats Base Ball team.

Featured photo is by Bruce Doll.

For more information on the village go to http://www.fallasburg.org

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Fallasburg bazaar press release

First bazaar celebrates 50th anniversary of Fallasburg village preservation

Fallasburg, MI- The first annual bazaar opens in Fallasburg village on Sept. 19th & Sept. 20th  from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It will feature area vendors and crafters unique and separate from the Fall Festival for the Arts, which also takes place that weekend.

The pioneer village founded by John Fallas in the 1830s is located across the Covered Bridge three miles north of Lowell. It nestles in the Fallasburg Park with the one-room schoolhouse serving as the village museum.

John Fallass house museum
John Fallass house museum

The purpose of the bazaar is to bring awareness to the quaint village that most people don’t know it exists.

“It’s a hidden gem,” said Ken Tamke, president of the Fallasburg Historical Society. “I love that place. It’s a little hamlet that became forgotten.”

Tents with crafts, food and arts will be set up by the Misner and Tower houses. All buildings will be open for self-guided tours without any admission.

“We’re not affiliated with the arts council,” said Tamke. “It will be a concurrent event.”

The mix of artists will include rock and metal artists, clothing, recycled welding artist, upcycled shabby furniture and home accessories and many more.

Fallassburgh Flats vintage baseball team
Fallassburgh Flats vintage baseball team

“Just cross the bridge into the village and step back in time,” said organizer Michelle Emaus. “We will have a nice mix of artists. Our intent is not to duplicate art at the festival, but to piggyback on a successful event.”

The organizers are testing the water to make the village bazaar into an annual event.

“We welcome feedback,” said Emaus. “We’re hoping to make this into an annual event, if the traffic warrants it.”

On Saturday only, the Fallassburg Flats, our 1860’s Vintage Base Ball Club will culminate their season by hosting their annual Fall Finale, The John Wesley Fallass Invitational Vintage Base Ball Tournament in Fallas Field across from the Fallasburg Schoolhouse.  Admission is free.  Preliminary games begin at 10:00AM with semi-final and final games in the afternoon followed by an awards ceremony around 5:00PM. For more information on the Fallasburg Historical Society, and the Bazaar:  www.fallasburg.org

For more information on the Fallassburgh Flats, and their season schedule:  fallassburgflats@gmail.com

Following is a list of Fallasburg Village Bazaar participants:

Hubbert’s Kettle Corn – Home of the famous Unicorn Poop – Steve & Becky Hubbert

Kettle corn, cinnamon corn, caramel corn, cheese corn, Hubbert’s mix corn,

Unicorn poop, frozen lemonade, jumbo pretzels w/cheese and bottled water

 Finger Stuck Felts – Kay Backstrom

Wool sculptures made from wool, using needles and wood-burning creations

Kathie’s Roadshow – Kathie Hollebeck

Womens jackets and tops, embellished sweater coats, scarves/jewelry and

deco mesh wreaths

Ava-Del Designs – Christine Dexter

Mixed media jewelry and crocheted hats

avadeldesigns.etsy.com

Mystic Mehndi – Jillian Hawkins/Jamie Shakleton

The service of applying henna to the body as a temporary “tattoo” – done on site with

after care instructions provided

Kropf’s Creations – Scott and Linda Phillips

Slabwood paintings, fabric jewelry, scarves, polished stones, coasters,

log wood furniture and magnets

Thunder Storm Rose Metal Art – Robert Rose (AKA “Franky”)

Recycled welding artist – taking salvaged and scrap metal objects and turning it into

artistic sculptures to be used as yard art

Doug and Marcia Alkema

Rock candle holders, rock oil burning holders and necklaces made of shell rock from        Tennessee – all in its natural shape, cleaned and sealed.  Candles are also available for             purchase

Shabby Chicnanigans – Michelle Emaus

Architectural salvage items and upcycled, shabby furniture and home accessories

Lowell Crew Team

 White’s Bridge Historical Society

Copyright (c) 2015 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.