Walking tours of Fallasburg village

Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) offers tours by appointment

Fallasburg, MI – Book your tour today for a walk through the 1850s historic village of Fallasburg located just six miles north of Lowell on the banks of the Flat River. You will be delighted by the quaint atmosphere of the hamlet far from the maddening crowds of big cities as you step back in time. The village, which started as a saw-and-grist milling operation, has been on the National Register of Historic Places since 1999.

The tour will take you from the one-room schoolhouse with the belfry and the original desks down the Covered Bridge Road past the historic buildings: the Misner House, the recently renovated Tower Farm and the J.W. Fallass House.

The Misner House is home to the village artifacts; these include treasures such as the Fallasburg Footprints, WWI Women’s Registration Cards among many others.

For a digital collection of artifacts go to:

https://collection.fallasburg.org/

You can visit the Fallass House as part of the tour. The tour ends by the Covered Bridge which is celebrating 150th anniversary this year. It’s a wonderful photo opportunity.

For appointment contact FHS president Ken Tamke via the website http://www.fallasburg.org or use the comment section in the blog or email kentamke@comcast.net

Featured photo: A small group tours the village.

Copyright (c) 2021. All rights reserved. Emma Blogs, LLC.

Tower Farm remodel completes Fallasburg historic village

Walking through the immaculate white rooms still smelling of fresh paint at the Tower Farm with pristine views of the Fallasburg village and the woods in the back, it would take the wildest imagination to transport you back in time before the remodel. The 1850s dilapidated farmhouse was falling apart, when the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) embarked on the ambitious remodel in May of 2020. It was the last missing piece in the total reconstruction of the historic village due to the limited funding and since it was the last building to be occupied, it provided income to the FHS.

However, the roof was replaced in 2011 and the windows were replaced in 2014 to save the structure from extreme decay. In the years past, the FHS peeled off the asphalt/fireboard siding put on in 1954. Within the past year, the FHS was able to secure individual donations to begin a proper renovation.

The Orlin Douglass/Tower Farm was built by Douglass in 1850.  It was later acquired by the Towers. In 1896, the right half of the farmhouse was moved from a nearby location so that sister-in-law’s, Tower and Steketee, could live together with their families.

The outside had greyish brown color and a layer of green fiberboard had been put on circa 1954 and peeled off during window installation, according to Craig Fonger, a volunteer and webmaster. All the mechanicals were replaced and proper fire blocking was installed to prevent fire from migrating to the second floor.

“COVID presented us with an opportunity we otherwise wouldn’t have had,” said Fonger. “This completes our village restoration and allows us to present a finished product to the world. Additionally the rental income will help benefit FHS.”

“I’m ecstatic about the Tower House rehabilitation,” said FHS president Ken Tamke.

  It has been a very long haul on this project, 30+ years, and the result is stunning.  Were it not for a couple of grants, the Lowell Area Community Fund administered by the Grand Rapids Community Foundation that awarded FHS a grant for a new roof in 2011, and the Lowell Cable Television Endowment Fund which awarded FHS a grant for new windows in 2014, the Tower House just might not have survived.

“The job our remarkable volunteers and contractors did that helped get the home to the finish line cannot be underestimated, many thanks to them,” Tamke said.  “They deserve a lion’s share of the credit.”

Fonger said that nothing in the structure was neither square or plumb.

“At almost every turn we were forced to improvise in some way, in some caseseschewing the assistannce of builders squares and levels and just making things fit,” he said.

But, there was also gratification in the fact that the Tower House was the last property in almost 30 lumberring years of rehabilitation- each succession building on the legacy of preceding FHS boards.

Fallasburg Village has undergone an amazing renewal and is finally to a point beyond damage control, but there will always be something, paint here, repair there, TLC all around.  The life of the preservationist is never boring or without tasks.  FHS is up to the challenge!

Over the last decade, the village has continued to improve buildings, according to the treasurer Alan Rumbaugh. First, the stagecoach was redone, then Blackmer, next the Fallas house, and then Betsy Fallas. The Post Office and and Beckwith Tavern have been nicely maintained. The Tower and Fallas barns have both had major repairs with the Tower Barn getting the Barn of the Year 2014.

The School House had a new front porch/deck put on last year and the entire building was repainted. The old shack beside the Stagecoach House has been torn down adn the double wide across the street has been removed and a new farm type house will be built on that property.

Now that the Tower House has been brought to reflect its past, we have a village street that we can start to promote to the public and build a much bigger following for the FHS.

We hope to have the Tower House disdplay farm artifacts in the FHS part of the house, reflecting the history of the “Tower Farm” and water melon crops. The other half of the house will have tenants that will not only give us some income to promote the village, but hope for them to be an active member, living in the village.

The Misner House will be repainted this summer and some other minor work done on it. The displays in that house would be more in line with domestic items, washing machines, spinning wheels, etc.

The Fallas House would be set up as it would have been in the 1800s. The School House will reflect the life in a one-room school, which was in use into 1950s. The other houses on the street are private residents and have noted on the yard signs.

The original plan was to restore the Tower House creating a museum that represented 20TH century life.  FHS has communicated regularly with the Tower Family and has obtained family mementoes, furnishings, pictures, and artifacts that will be displayed.  We hope to hold occasional meetings, gatherings and outdoor functions supported by our new kitchen with this landmark farmhouse and grounds as the backdrop.

According to treasurer Al Rumbaugh, farming artifacts and memorabilia will be stored at Tower the House. The Tower House will also be used as office to work on program planning and archival projects.

Fonger credited much of the work to Rumbaugh and David Cadwallader who spent many hours on the project.

Copyright (c)2021 . Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Tower Farm renovations-phase II

The next phase of the Tower Farm restorations has begun.

The crew has mostly painted the outside of the Tower Farm.  The foam insulation is being installed.  Then the sheet rock insulation will start.  The four porches are getting new decking during this time also.  The heating will be completed. Once the sheet rock is done, painting the inside will begin.  Then all the cabinets will be installed and plumbing finalized.   Long process that may be completed by the end of the year.

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Copyright (c) 2020. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Old publications found @Tower Farm

Fallasburg, MI – During the recent remodel work on the 1850s Tower Farm at the Fallasburg historic village, the crew found publications from 1951 including American Weekly from May 13, 1951.

We encourage our followers and fans to submit their photos from the Fallasburg village to us. Fallasburg will soon be decked out in its autumn glory. Get your cameras ready.

For Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) artifacts go to Collective Access at https://collection.fallasburg.org

Note: The FHS annual village bazaar will not take place this year. Our neighbors- the Fallasburg Arts Festival has gone virtual on Sept.19-20 with a raffle of the “Blue Lagoon” quilt by Dawn Ysseldyke. On Sept. 20 at 5 p.m., a live-streamed “pulling of the winning ticket” ceremony will be held to announce the winner of the quilt.

Blue Lagoon by Dawn Ysseldyke.

Copyright (c) 2020. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Tower Farm remodel update

 The Tower Farm $75,000 remodel is on schedule

Here is the latest on the remodel from Fallasburg Historical Society treasurer, Al Rumbaugh.

The stone mason has finished redoing all the fallen rocks in the basement and we now have a secure foundation. The new well is active and health department has approved it and the water it is supplying. The plumbers have finished the rough in of the drains and water lines. The general contractor, Choice Contracting, has finished most of the interior work, adding new headers, opening doorways up as was designed, redoing floor and ceiling beams and has replaced the damaged and missing siding on the back of the house. 

We are waiting for the approval of the Michigan Historical Society to say we can build the porch with a roof on the east side of the house. The heating contractor will start Monday putting in an entirely new heating system.  The electrical contractor came out last week and has started with a preliminary layout of the plan. Estimates are being accepted for sprayed in foam insulation once the other work is completed. 

The Tower Farm is the last building to be rehabilitated in the picturesque village on the banks of the Flat River. During the last two years, the Fallas House needed repairs due to major damage from pipes breaking over a winter. The bathroom, kitchen, and damaged walls were redone. A new roof was put on along with a total paint job. The Blackmer House and Betsy Fallas houses have all been rehabbed, the barn was redone and that left only the Tower House. This will be the last one on the Covered Bridge Rd. leading to the Covered Bridge, except for the rundown cottage by the bridge. The Misner House and the School House had been finished long time ago.

“The entire village street will look great with well-kept homes,” said Rumbaugh.

Copyright (c) 2020. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Tower Farm renovations

Tower Farm renovations to complete Fallasburg village street look

By Emma Palova

Fallasburg, MI – The Tower Farm in the historic Fallasburg village will be renovated following the approval by the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) this week for approximately $75,000.

The 1850s historical building has deteriorated over the years, but has been patched up with a few fixes funded by grants from the Lowell Cable Television Fund and the Lowell Area Community Fund.

These included a new roof on the Tower Farm and new windows along with other exterior jobs such as the removal of asphalt shingles from the siding and repairs to the siding.

The ongoing restoration of the Orlin Douglass/Tower Farm has been in progress since 2010/2011.

The Orlin Douglass/Tower Farm was built by Douglass in 1850.  It was later acquired by the Towers. In 1896, the right half of the farmhouse was moved from a nearby location so that sister-in-law’s, Tower and Steketee, could live together with their families. 

One of the FHS board members Addie Abel lived in the Tower Farm until 1959. The Towers grew watermelons on the farm and sold them in Lowell.

“I was a Tower,” she laughed, “my connection to the house is that it was my home. I love that place.”

Abel said she doesn’t mind the proposed renovations.

“It belongs to the FHS, I would live there in a heart beat,” she said.

However, as the interior deteriorated, the FHS sought of ways to fix it up.

“Initial financing was all grant-based,” said FHS president Ken Tamke. “Over the years some other minor exterior fixes have taken place. This was the result of volunteer labor and not necessitating large outlays of the society’s funds.”

As with any historical building, the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) sets forth guidelines for preservation. According to these guidelines, the façade of a National and State Historic Property cannot be changed.

The concrete block covered the entry on the farm was removed, but it was not part of the original home. The roof had broken through and the concrete blocks had settled impeding closure and security of the entry doors.

The society is proposing to put back a second porch modeled after the original porch on the dwelling.

“We will contact the SHPO with any plans,” said Tamke. “Should it compromise any historic designations, it will not be built.”

The Tower Farm, which consists of two units, is zoned as single residential and a home-based business. As such, the FHS will rent out the single residential portion and retain the home-based business part for its own use as office space.

The use of the community garden on the four-acre property is currently being negotiated.

“We are still in negotiations on the volunteers for the garden and what will be produced on it,” said vice-president Tina Cadwallader.

The Tower Farm is the last building to be rehabilitated in the picturesque village on the banks of the Flat River. During the last two years, the Fallas House needed repairs due to major damage from pipes breaking over a winter. The bathroom, kitchen, and damaged walls were redone. A new roof was put on along with a total paint job. The Blackmer House and Betsy Fallas houses have all been rehabbed, the barn was redone and that left only the Tower House. This will be the last one on the Covered Bridge Rd. leading to the Covered Bridge, except for the rundown cottage by the bridge. The Misner House and the School House had been finished long time ago.

“The entire village street will look great with well-kept homes,” said FHS treasurer Al Rumbaugh.

The FHS expects to accomplish the final renovation project through volunteer labor and FHS’ financial resources with the future promise of rents to replenish reserves and charitable donations.

The main contractor for the project is Choice Contractors, Rosendall Well Drilling will be doing the well, Jack Mellema is the stone mason and Arctic Air will be doing the heating.

The FHS board will hold the annual board meeting on June 15 at 4 p.m. at the Lowell Area Chamber of Commerce. The public is invited to provide input.

Feature photo: project coordinator/FHS treasurer Al Rumbaugh in front of the Tower Farm.

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Tours at the Fallasburg school.

2016 Fallasburg village in retrospect

1880s Fallasburg pioneer village emerges as a historical treasure in 2016

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Fallasburg, MI – No pun intended, but 2016 was a year for the “history books” for the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS).

It was a transformative year from a sleepy village lost in time for more than a century to a rejuvenated historical treasure waiting to be discovered.

Better known for the Fallasburg Covered Bridge, which connects the hustle from the Lincoln Lake traffic to this hamlet, the Fallasburg village in 2016 emerged on its own merit.

With the new FHS events, increased online presence in “Fallasburg Today” blog, E-Newsletter & social media, and the updated website, the village connected with the right audience. That is with the lovers of history scattered around the world.

 Starting in the spring of 2016, FHS volunteers scrubbed and cleaned to get its signature museum, the one-room 1867 schoolhouse with the belfry, ready for the season.

Annually, the FHS participates in the “Spring into the Past” museum tour organized by the Tri-River Museum Network on the first weekend in May.

Mark your calendars, this year the “Spring into the Past” tour falls on May 6, 7, 2017.

The event opens up the Fallasburg village located inside the Fallasburg Park for the tourist season. The museum is open from 2p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sundays from May to October, or by appointment.

Much like the park, the village reflects the colors of the season throughout the year. It’s yours to explore at any time of the year with walking, hiking and biking trails running through village.

The Falassburgh Flats Vintage Base Ball team starts its season on the ball field located at the village with the first game in May.

The biggest fundraiser of the year, is the annual Fallasburg Covered Bridge bike tour. The 23rd annual bike tour will be held on July 9th with several bike tour options. For complete info visit http://fallasburgtoday.org or www.fallasburg.org.

The tour gives you a unique opportunity to explore the pioneer village and the northern east region of Kent County in Michigan.

The fall in Fallasburg brings robust colors with epic events. These include the annual Fallasburg village bazaar inside the pioneer village. This novelty event in its third year coincides with the Fallasburg Fall Festival for the Arts.

Both events will be held on Sept. 16 & Sept. 17, 2017.

The FHS was included in the “Past online” pilot by the Lowell Area Historical Museum launched in the fall of 2016. Intern Katelyn Bosch from Calvin College assisted in the online project.

Bosch said that she likes the village as a historic entity because it has streets, unlike most museums which are single buildings.

The brand new Ghostbusters @ Fallasburg event was held last year on Oct. 29th. It featured village haunting and the haunted walk.

“We attracted visitors that would not have otherwise come to the village,” said Ken Tamke, FHS president.

But the crowning jewel of 2016 was the annual “Christmas at Fallasburg” party held on Dec, 10 inside the one-room schoolhouse with the signature bonfire. The party attracted a record number of visitors, according to Tamke.

From newcomers, drawn in by the social media, from as far as Ukraine to the oldest Fallasburg resident of Swiss origin, Edwin Roth, 94, the party was a smorgasbord for the history lover.

“I’ve never been to a Christmas party inside a museum,” said Irina from Ukraine, a student at the Grand Valley State University (GVSU) graduate program in Grand Rapids.

Currently, the FHS is in the process of updating its website. Stay tuned for more progress at this emerging Fallasbirg gem in the rough.

This post is also in response to the Daily Post “Retrospective” at

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/discover-challenges/retrospective

Subscribe to the Fallasburg Today E-Newsletter below:

For more info check the following links:

Fallasburg at www.fallasburg.org

Fallasburg Today blog at http://fallasburgtoday.org

Tri-River Museum Network at www.ioniahistory.org/tri-river-group.html

Fallassburgh Flats Vintage Base Ball Club at www.fallassburghflats.com

Past online at www.thepastonline.org

Copyright © 2016. Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Heating up the night at Fallasburg

Christmas party at Fallasburg scores high

FHS president Ken Tamke speaks about the annual Christmas party held last Saturday at Fallasburg:

In the grips of the polar vortex once again, the cold and the snow, we didn’t quite know what to expect for “Christmas in Fallasburg.”  Party planners take note of the scouting motto, “Be Prepared.”  Not only did we have one of our best turnouts ever, but the diverse mix of guests, young and old, Villagers and visitors, created a positive party vibe that swept the crowd right up inside it.  Bruce and Becca Ling’s Hawks & Owls String Band played inspired.  Patty and Melanie’s food was fabulous and so were all the potluck contributions, thanks.  Everything was gone at the end of the evening.  And, the bonfire…  Well, I’ve said all along, it was almost a shame to light it.  It was so artfully constructed by Villager, Craig Wood.  Enjoying those flames and that heat with those gathered was a most magnificent cap to the evening.  Thanks to all who attended and thanks for your support of the Fallasburg Historical Society and our efforts to preserve Fallasburg Village.  Happy Holidays!!!

By Emma Palova

Fallasburg, MI -Okay, the Christmas party last week at the one-room 1867 Fallasburg schoolhouse was a smash in spite of the fresh snow outside, freezing cold inside and that some folks have mistaken the bonfire for a real fire.

“After all these years, I think they pretty much have it under control,” said a spectator taking a selfie by the bonfire.

“Can you hear it crackling?”

Yes, the huge bonfire crackled, melted the snow around it, attracted snowmobile riders and heated up the night.

Some area residents claimed the snow-capped logs of wood and carved their names in them.

“It was our biggest party ever,” said Ken Tamke, Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) president.

Inside the schoolhouse people mingled to the sounds of the strings by the Hawks and Owls band nestled in the far corner by the cold stove.

Not only were there newcomers from near such as Saranac, but there were newcomers from as far as Ukraine like Irina.

Irina, a grad student of history at Grand Valley State University, came to the party with friends.

“This is so authentic,” she said. “I had no idea you could go inside the museum buildings.”

Absolutely. Thanks to the recent efforts of the FHS team, most of the buildings of the Fallasburg historical village dating to 1837 are accessible to the public.

The flagship Fallasburg School serves as the official museum of the FHS, and is open from May to October.

The only exception to public access currently is the gray-bluish Tower Farm, built circa 1850. However, the FHS is working relentlessly to get all the museums up to date.

Recently, the FHS has applied for a grant for some roof repair and website upgrades.

The Christmas party tradition, as a fundraiser for the FHS maintenance of the buildings, has been going strong, according to old-timers.

Edwin Roth, 94, the oldest Fallasburg resident has been coming to the party for at least a decade.

“I am 100 percent Swiss,” he bragged. “My parents came from Switzerland.”

Roth farmed in the area in the 1940s and for many decades beyond. He makes it a point not to miss the annual Christmas party. Long time volunteer Frank Brechbiel escorted Roth into the schoolhouse.

The schoolhouse was beautifully decorated for the season with a dinner buffet and a grog station set up by the windows.

The good people of Fallasburg lovingly called as “villagers” brought in food and desserts.

FHS board member Tina Siciliano Cadwallader made her entrance with a wooden box labeled as “Dangerous Explosives” full of bags of popcorn and other goodies.

Volunteer Patty Brechbiel manned the food station featuring among other dishes three different types of meatballs.

“Are these all the same?” Irina asked.

“No, try them all,” I said.

The party provided an excellent opportunity to check out the “little room in the back” with collections treasures. A young history lover explored the model of the Fallasburg village locked in a glass case.

On display on the shelves were class photos. There was Mrs. Richmond’s class from 1947 and a Fallasburg village plat map on a wooden board.

As the bell rang in the belfry, the chatter and music in the schoolhouse continued into the night. A drive through the lighted Fallasburg Covered Bridge was a perfect ending to a perfect party.

Come visit Fallasburg, located northeast of Lowell, throughout the year. You will treat yourself to a lesson in American pioneer history from the 1830s that started with founder John Wesley Fallass.

You will marvel at the treasures the village has to offer.

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.

Ken Tamke @fallasburg

Ghostbusters at Fallasburg

A ghost walk and a history lesson at Fallasburg

By Emma Palova

EW Emma’s Writings

Fallasburg, MI- It was a spooky Saturday night before Halloween at the Fallasburg historical village.

“Put your cell phones in the airplane mode,” advised Edwin Lelieveld, Michigan Paranormal Alliance (MPA) team member.

The Michigan Paranormal Alliance (MPA), the Fallasburg Historical Society (FHS) and their followers conducted a paranormal investigation inside the Fallasburg museum buildings.

“This has been two years in the making,” said Tina Siciliano Cadwallader, FHS event organizer.

Signing in @fallasburg
Tina Siciliano Cadwallader organized the paranormal investigation @fallasburg

Cadwallader put the first time event together as a fundraiser for the historical society.

The MPA started with an introduction inside the Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse museum. We filed behind the old creaking and squeaky desks much like the students did some 150 years ago. The classroom filled up and there was standing room only.

Inside @fallasburg
Ghost hunters inside the Fallasburg schoolhouse museum.

The ghost detecting equipment such as gauss meters, temperature gauges and nitrogen goggles laid on a separate table by the old piano.

The MPA team set up laser purple dot grids and EVP (Electronic Voice Phenomenon) equipment at each location of the paranormal investigation. That is the Fallasburg one-room schoolhouse, John Wesley Fallass House and David Misner House, all of which sit on the Covered Bridge Road. An MPA team member was at each location to interpret the recordings of the EVP sessions.

MPA @fallasburg
The Michigan Paranormal Alliance (MPA) conducts investigation @fallasburg

We divided into three groups, each led by an FHS docent.

My husband Ludek and I were in the group with FHS president Ken Tamke and Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) employees. We walked down the Covered Bridge Road lighting our way with flashlights. We briefly paused at the Tower Farm, better known as the Tower House. We could not go inside because of its dilapidated interior. The FHS is currently seeking funds to repair the Tower House.

“Two sisters lived here,” said Tamke. “It was normal at the time.”

Tamke said there have been reports of haunting at the Tower House.

Local resident Addie Tower Abel, who went to the one-room schoolhouse, said there has been a lot of activity.

“I know about the Tower House, I lived there. So, did my son, they saw a lot of activities,” Abel wrote on facebook.

Lie Kotecki of MPA conducted the EVP session inside the 1842 John W. Fallass house. The temperature gauge in the middle of the completely restored living room showed 66.6 F. According to the MPA, the temperature drops when ghosts are present causing cold spots. The ghosts also give out electromagnetic fields.

Inside John W. House @fallasburg
Lie Kotecki of Michigan Paranormal Society (MPA) conducts an EVP session inside the John W. Fallass House.

“Drop the temperature if you are inside the house with us,” challenged Lie.

The temperature dropped slightly to 66.2 F.

“Did you live in this house?” she asked. “We have no bad energy.”

The FHS president Ken Tamke explained the historical facts at each paranormal investigative location aka museum building.

“The furniture was built from the lumber out of a sawmill at Fallasburg,” he said. “Orwin Douglas built the Tower House and John Waters built the David Misner House.”

Native Indian collection @fallasburg
Native Indian collection @fallasburg

Back at the schoolhouse, Rosemary Leleiveld reported various ghost encounters.

“I felt a female spirit here,” she said. “Missy or Melissa…..”

But, Tamke said it could have been the ghost of Fallasburg resident Ferris Miller, who had died within the last five years.

“We have modern devices,” said Rosemary, “but we come with respect.”

The next EVP session followed at the Misner House. It is the most completed museum out of the Fallasburg portfolio, according to Tamke.

The MPA members usually turn off the lights for the sessions, although they have done EVP sessions in the middle of the day.

Inside Misner House @fallasburg
Michigan Paranormal Alliance members Peggy and Jason Kotecki listen to EVP recording at the Misner House.

“The atmosphere veil becomes thinner,” said Peggy Kotecki, MPA team member. “We use radio frequencies and cameras,” she said.

Jason Kotecki, IT engineer at VanAndel Institute, analyzed the EVP recording at the Misner House and reported about other findings. The MPA team conducted a session in Allegan.

“Have you been to the old Allegan county jail?” Jason asked.

“Not yet,” said Ludek Pala.

“Well, we heard a giggle there,” he said.

Peggy, a nurse at Spectrum, said that sometimes she questions her sanity.

“It’s mostly a boring thing to do,” she said. “We do a lot of recordings and a lot of listening. But, you go for the whole package and you relive it.”

During the EVP session, Peggy asked questions:

“What is your name? Did you live here? Did you have children? Did they go to the schoolhouse down the road?”

The MPA does not solicit business and the paranormal alliance does not charge for their investigations.

“The purpose of the investigation is two-fold,” Rosemary Leleiveld said. “We do ghost hunting and we have ghost hunting equipment at each location. You do a ghost walk and learn more of a history of a location. The architecture draws me in.”

For more info on Fallasburg go to www.fallasburg.org

For more info on MPA go to: www.m-p-a.org

For more info on EW Emma’s Writings go to http://emmapalova.com

Copyright (c) 2016 Emma Blogs, LLC. All rights reserved.